"Remember, I am with you always to the end of the age" (Mt 28:20)


Healing The World Series: Pope Francis' Wednesday General Audience (August 5, August 12)

Creator: Stefano Spaziani
Credit: Stefano Spaziani
Copyright: © Stefano Spaziani
On Aug. 5, 2020, Pope Francis started with a new catechesis series on healing the world from the physical and social ills vis-à-vis the coronavirus pandemic. I would like to re-issue in 8thworker the Holy Father's catechesis on integral ecology that intertwine concerns about "the economy, the environment, illness, death and sin," among others.  The Pope has encouraged Catholics around the world to respond with faith and hope to the challenges of the global pandemic.










Notable quotes:
“To heal the world”
“Within the Christian tradition, faith, hope and charity are much more than feelings or attitudes. They are virtues infused in us through the grace of the Holy Spirit (see CCC, 1812, 1813): gifts that heal us and that make us healers, gifts that open us to new horizons, even while we are navigating the difficult waters of our time.”

“Jesus’s ministry offers many examples of healing: when He heals those affected by fever (see Mk 1:29-34), by leprosy (see Mk 1:40-45), by paralysis (see Mk 2:1-12); when He restores sight (see Mk 8:22-26; Jn 9:1-7), speech or hearing (see Mk 7:31-37). In reality, He heals not only the physical evil which is true, physical evil but He heals the entire person. In that way, He restores the person back to the community also, healed; He liberates the person from isolation because He has healed him or her.”



Notable quotes:
“Commendable is the effort of so many people who have been offering evidence of human and Christian love for neighbour, dedicating themselves to the sick even at the risk of their own health. They are heroes!”

“The harmony created by God asks that we look at others, the needs of others, the problems of others, in communion. We want to recognise the human dignity in every person, whatever his or her race, language or condition might be. Harmony leads you to recognise human dignity, that harmony created by God, with humanity at the centre.”

“This renewed awareness of the dignity of every human being has serious social, economic and political implications. Looking at our brother and sister and the whole of creation as a gift received from the love of the Father inspires attentive behaviour, care and wonder. In this way the believer, contemplating his or her neighbour as a brother or sister, and not as a stranger, looks at him or her compassionately and empathetically, not contemptuously or with hostility.”

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